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A Little More Abstract

Crafting For Those Dedicated to Experimentation

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Rigid Heddle

Progress with my Scar(ves)

leftovers-scarf-with-leno-2scarf-with-leno-1

The top scarf is what happens when I run out of the right color of weft yarn to finish the first scarf and decide to try a totally different effect to create a small second scarf.  This is all made from handspun yarn, which is why I am a little worried that the stripe of green will full in a different way than the rest of the scarf.  If there is more twist or less give to that section it will pucker everything around it, in which case it is a ruffle scarf and I meant to do that, LOL.  This is all made from handspun yarn, which is why I am a little worried that the stripe of green will full in a different way than the rest of the scarf.  If there is more twist or less give to that section it will pucker everything around it, in which case it is a ruffle scarf and I meant to do that, LOLInstead of a one-over leno like I did on the bottom scarf, I decided to do a 2 over leno on this scarf.  The effect is much more dramatic and I am excited to see what it looks like washed as well.  I finished the ends off slightly differently to see if the methods I was taught would work to keep the ends from fraying, if not I will hem the edges.  I tried, and succeeded, to put a slit into the fabric that was woven intentionally.  The effect is neat, but I do need to plan a bit better since the slit is no where near either end but instead somewhere in the middle, lol.

Okay so the bottom image is the scarf that I intended to weave, pre washing.  It is neat, though I believe next time I will leave more room for fringe, and I like how the leno turned out.  The little holes are supposed to be there, if you have seen my last post about the scarf you can see what they looked like while I was weaving them, and I cannot wait to see how they will turn out when I am done.

My selvedges need a lot of work, I know this so this is something I can work on in the future.  I am very pleased with how everything turned out!

Happy Crafting!

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Weaving to Distraction

I love crafting.  With the school year already underway I have decided to take my crafting to the next level, alright so I already did that by purchasing a spinning wheel earlier this year.  While preparing for Spinzilla (yes, I am that excited about this) I went through my stash, as I mentioned in an earlier post, and discovered that I have spun up a lot more than I thought I did.  With this in mind, I decided to take the plunge and try to weave up some of my handspun yarn.  The pictures above are of my efforts.  This is my handspun in a 7.5 dent reed on a 10″ ashford sample-it rigid heddle loom.  It is a plain weave with Leno Lace in between.  I can tell you that the warp and weft are all wool, I believe that it is primarily Merino wool.  While this started out as a bag, it might turn into a scarf depending on how it washes up!

I am so happy, and cannot wait to see it finished.  At the same time I am really enjoying the creative process!

Happy Crafting

Rigid Heddle Weaving

Rigid Heddle Pickup Sticks Acrylic.JPG

The Enchanted Mountain Weavers Guild has given me the courage to go forth and Weave!  Okay so I joined the guild and they have been teaching me tips and tricks to improve my rigid heddle weaving.  I obtained a 10″ Ashford Sample It Loom, and I was promptly intimidated, I did try a test project but it did not go as smoothly as I would have liked.  With the guild’s help I managed my first scarf and had the courage to go forth and start my second scarf.  This is scarf made with Red Heart Acrylic Yarn, containing a simple pick up pattern.  I am really pleased with the eye scorching results.  The yarn is fluorescent so it looks even neater under a black light!

A Little While

It has been a while since I have had time to craft and therefor post about crafting.  Life does take funny turns, good and bad often intertwining until you are not certain which way to look.  I have completed my second piece on my rigid heddle loom, but have no pictures yet.  It was an experiment in selvedges, beating, and color.  I have not had an opportunity to wash the piece so once it is finished by washing and drying I will declare it a success or failure, probably a scarf really!

The bad, mom is going to need surgery and they consider her a high risk candidate.  We will do everything we can to keep her as long as she retains a good quality of life.  Prayer is about all that will help.  The good is a student going to the community college I work at had a large metal Jack Floor Loom she was not certain of what she was going to do with.  Upon hearing of my interest in weaving she offered me that loom in addition to a rigid heddle loom.  The rigid heddle loom is beautiful it needed a front apron bar and probably a new heddle.  I am very excited to have received this loom.  I am in awe of my floor loom.  I will confess, I am very dismayed at the state.  It  could be a lot worse and there is a basic frame to work with but it needs a lot of work before I would consider putting my clean yarn on it.  Especially if you consider how long it takes to warp a loom, there is no point in warping on a dirty loom.

It was a physical therapy loom created by the G.E. Miller Inc. company out of Yonkers, NY.  They are still in existence today though I do not think they make looms any longer (I plan on calling or e-mailing to find out).  Here are a few shots of what my loom looks like now, I meant to get some of it assembled but I was so excited to get started I forgot and had disassembled the heddles before I remembered.  You can see the loom, the paint is rustier in person; the heddle frames.  The heddles and their rusted shafts in a bucket with my work gloves, and the identifier sticker on the reed frame.  It looks good in the pictures and fortunately the basic structure is sound.  I look forward to getting it in perfect order again though it will take a ton of work.

Rigid Heddle Loom

Recently Ashford came out with a 10″ Sample-It Loom.  Previously they had an 8″ Sample-It Loom I was thinking about getting, the 10″ was only $7 more than the 8″ and already comes set up for a double heddle experience, I could not resist.  I have not taken any real classes on the rigid heddle loom and, since there is not as much information available on the Kindle Unlimited plan, I have not read as much as I would like on the subject.  Despite these limitations, I managed to watch a few movies and am in the middle of reading “The Weavers Idea Book” by Jane Patrick, I did weave a piece of fabric that I enjoyed creating.  The warp was my Corriedale in Summer Days along with a bit of a wool mixture I carded up.  The weft started with some crochet cotton then I used a commercial blue yarn.  The picture below is before I washed  the piece to finish it.  Once I washed it the energized yarn that made up the wool mixture activated the twist causing the fabric to ruffle a bit.  I like the effect for a beginning piece and can imagine how it could be used as a weft to finish off the edge of a piece or in the warp of a much larger piece.

My First weaving

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