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A Little More Abstract

Crafting For Those Dedicated to Experimentation

3 Tips for Drumcarding Top

http://knittyblog.com/2017/08/3-tips-for-drumcarding-top/

There are a lot of resources out there for learning how best to use a drum carder, these past three articles are a great resource for introducing a lot of the concepts involved in drum carding.  This blog is probably a good one to follow also.

With this article, I especially liked the tip where the author says to hand card some of your smaller bits of fiber first to spread it out a bit more.  I had never thought of that before, but it makes perfect sense to keep things thin and even.

Happy Crafting!

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Top to Batt: More Adventures in Carding

http://knittyblog.com/2017/08/top-to-batt-more-adventures-in-carding/

Again this is a great article!

I had a similar experience recently with a beautiful hand dyed top I picked up from a local dyer.  I wanted to create a striped batt by separating out the yellow from orange from red.  The colors blended a bit more than I thought I wanted, but the end result is two fantastic batts, with sparkle (I like sparkle so I added sparkle), that I plan on spinning separately and then plying together.  As soon as I am done enjoying the fluffiness that is their batt form.

Happy Crafting, and read this article.  Short but sweet!

The Sandwich Part of My Batts

http://knittyblog.com/2017/09/the-sandwich-part-of-my-batts/

I love the newsletters I get from Strauch Fiber Equipment.  They always lead me to such wonderful places.  In this case the article points out, in a very quick way, a method of adding in extra materials into a batt, that goes through a drum carder, without getting extra things stuck in the drum carder.  Great article!

Happy Crafting!

Ask Madelyn: Warp Tension

https://www.interweave.com/article/weaving/ask-madelyn-warp-tension/

If you weave, read this article.  If you don’t weave but you’re thinking about weaving, read this article.  If you know someone who weaves, read this article.

I enjoy articles that explain why things are the way they are.  I know that it is important to have a tight tension on your warp, it never really occured to me Why I needed a tight tension on my warp.  Or that my tension wasn’t tight enough and that is why I have all of those sagging threads when I’m trying to weave.

Read this article!

Happy Crafting!

Choosing a Loom You Love by Sarah E. Horton

https://www.interweave.com/article/weaving/choosing-loom-love/

This is a great article that sums up the tension between a rigid heddle loom and a multi shaft floor loom.  I think that there are more considerations, regarding floor space and time constraints, but this does sum up most of the issue.  Rigid heddle looms do have a lot more versatility to them than they appear to at first.  If I’m honest I should spend a lot more time with my rigid heddle loom learning all of the neat tricks it is capable of.  I’ve got to make a lace scarf at some point using some of the techniques available to me.  Maybe that will be one of my next projects!

Happy Weaving!

4 Tools Every Weaver Wants by Liz Good

https://www.interweave.com/article/weaving/4-tools-every-weaver-wants/

I have to agree with Liz, these are great tools.  From a mini loom to mini cones of yarn, these are amazing additions to the weaver’s toolkit.  The yarn swift is neat, but I really like mine so I don’t think a wooden table top model is a ‘Key’ tool.  A really nice shuttle is awesome too.

Happy Crafting!

Floating Selvedges and S-Hooks by Madelyn van der Hoogt

https://www.interweave.com/article/weaving/floating-selvedges-and-s-hooks/

This is a great answer to a question about floating selvedges.  When you are weaving a piece on a 4+ shaft loom it is usually a good idea to have a floating selvedge on either side (left and right) of your piece.  These threads help you to ensure that each pick (weft thread) is firmly embedded at the edges.  If you are doing a pattern where you go under 3 threads each time, or over 3 threads, or more on a very complex loom, then there is the possibility that you will have a couple of warp threads just running up the side of your piece for 2-3 rows or more depending on your pattern.  This would look stupid, I know from experience, and get snagged really easily.  By putting the selvedges in you keep the edges looking tidy.  To learn more about selvedges I recommend checking out the video mentioned in this article.

Happy Crafting!

Crafting Articles

I’ve been neglecting this blog a little bit.  While I’m working on different crafts and working on..well work, I don’t have as much time to blog as I would like.  Fortunately for me much of my work involves my passions so I’m able to read a wide variety of articles, technology, crafts, library science, speech therapies, makerspaces, etc. while I am at work because my work involves everything under the sun.  Very rarely does something that I read not come up in a work situation later, it is a ton of fun and never boring.  Enough about work though, I wanted to let you know I’m going to be posting a series of articles about crafting topics I’ve read recently.  There will be links to the articles as well as a brief synopsis and any comments I care to make.

The first few will be about weaving, and we will see where these lead me from there!

To catch you up on my crafting, I’ve been slightly obsessed with making Hexipuffs.  To the extent that I have deluded myself into thinking that I can make socks.  Cross your fingers and hope for the best…it’s going to be a bumpy ride!

Happy Crafting!

Spinzilla 2017

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I had a ton of fun spinning for Spinzilla 2017!  I managed to spin 1.27 miles of yarn, this includes the singles and then the ‘ply credit’.  I am very pleased with the yarn I managed to spin, though I am disappointed that I could not get my WooleeWinder working right for spinzilla.

However the creator and owner of the company promised he would look at my WooleeWinder and see if he could figure out what is making it rattle so badly.  I just have to send my device to him, lol.  Haven’t gotten around to that yet.

I cannot wait until I have these skeins washed and ready to work with.  One of my greatest fears has been ‘ruining’ my handspun by knitting or crocheting or weaving the ‘wrong’ pattern with them.  Now after almost 2 years of spinning…I’d better do something with my handspun pretty soon, lol.  I have a 3 drawer plastic storage unit full of handspun yarn, and I love all of  it!

Recently I took the dive and purchased the pattern for the beekeeper’s quilt, and just love how simple the hexipuffs are to create.  I made 3 out of a self striping ball of commercial sock yarn, this brought about the delusion that I want to knit socks which is another problem on the horizon, then last night I took the plunge.  I knit a Hexipuff out of my handspun.  I love my little hexipuff and cannot wait to make more.  While I’m not sure I”ll make the 300+ it takes to create a quilt, I do think that these hexipuff’s might become my new  Granny Square.  My new go-to, quick to finish, project.

TIP:  I use the tip of my left index finger to push my needle through the yarn when knitting.  The tip of the needle is a little bit pointed, but not enough to stab me…However…repeated pushing allowed my skin, probably dry, to split along the natural whorls in my fingertip.  While it never bled, it did hurt a bit.  I realized that I would have to use something to prevent this from happening, and thought of a thimble.  Unfortunately I cannot feel anything through the thimble so that didn’t work.  Then I thought of some of those stick on thimble things I had seen…it turns out they’re a little expensive.  Fortunately during my search I turned up a tip, a Bandage.  Just a simple bandage, can get about 30 for $1 at a dollar store, is enough padding to keep the needle from splitting my skin.  YAY I Can Knit Again!

Happy Crafting!

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